Updates

Update on ATLAS and CMS latest results

The ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN are taking a very cautionary position concerning a measurement that deviates slightly from what would be expected from known physics. Studying events containing two photons and assuming that these photons originate from the decay of a massive particle, both experiments see a small excess in the mass region of 750-760 GeV. The same analyses were also carried out on the data from the first LHC run and, within the statistics available, did not yield a sizable excess over the expectations from standard physics processes.

LHC experiments to explore new frontiers in physics

Early tomorrow morning Geneva time, the CERN Large Hadron Collider will attempt to start delivering physics data for the first time in 27 months. After an almost two year shutdown and several months of re-commissioning, the LHC experiments are ready to take data at the unprecedented energy of 13 TeV, almost double the collision energy of its first run. This will mark the start of season 2 at the LHC, opening the way to new discoveries.

First images of collisions at 13 TeV

Geneva, 21 May 2015. Last night, protons collided in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the record-breaking energy of 13 TeV for the first time. These test collisions were to set up systems that protect the machine and detectors from particles that stray from the edges of the beam.

A key part of the process was the set-up of the collimators. These devices which absorb stray particles were adjusted in colliding-beam conditions. This set-up will give the accelerator team the data they need to ensure that the LHC magnets and detectors are fully protected.

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