Press releases

The BASE experiment at CERN compares protons and antiprotons with high precision

Geneva, 12 August 2015. In a paper published today in Nature, the Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE1) at CERN2's Antiproton Decelerator (AD), reports the most precise comparison of the charge-to-mass ratio of the proton to that of its antimatter equivalent, the antiproton. The charge-to-mass ratio — an important property of particles — can be measured by observing the oscillation of a particle in a magnetic field. The new result shows no difference between the proton and the antiproton, with a four-fold improvement in the energy resolution compared with previous measurements.

The latest results from the LHC experiments are presented in Vienna

Geneva/Vienna, 27 July 2015. The world particle-physics community has convened in Vienna for the 2015 European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics (EPS-HEP2015), where the latest results in the field are being presented and discussed. These include the first results from Run 2 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN1, which are being presented for the very first time, less than two months after the experiments started to take data at the unprecedented energy of 13 TeV, following a two-year long shutdown.

CERN announces winners of its 2015 beamline for schools competition

Geneva, 15 June 2015. CERN1 today announced the winners of its 2015 beamline for schools competition. Two teams of high-school students have been selected to travel to CERN in September to carry out their own experiments using a CERN accelerator beam. The winners, the “Leo4G” team from Liceo Scientifico Leonardo da Vinci School in Florence, Italy and the “Accelerating Africa” team from St John's College and Barnato Park High School in Johannesburg, South Africa, were selected from 119 teams from around the world, adding up to about 1050 high-school students.

LHC experiments are back in business at a new record energy

Geneva, 3 June 2015. Today, CERN1's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started delivering physics data for the first time in 27 months. After an almost two year shutdown and several months re-commissioning, the LHC is now providing collisions to all of its experiments at the unprecedented energy of 13 TeV, almost double the collision energy of its first run. This marks the start of season 2 at the LHC, opening the way to new discoveries. The LHC will now run round the clock for the next three years.


Subscribe to Latest press releases

You are here