LHC First Physics

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CERN Control Centre on 30 March 2010 (Image: CERN)

The Large Hadron Collider physics programme began on 30 March 2010 with collisions in the LHC at 7 TeV (3.5 TeV per beam). This is an archive page of the event that provides easy access to a collection of photos and event displays of the collisions as well as all videos of the preparations for and the start of the physics programme.

The Large Hadron Collider is scheduled to run for the next 18 to 24 months to deliver a wealth of data to the experiments. Follow its progress on twitter or subscribe to CERN's press releases.

 

Schedule

The following schedule will guide you through the relevant events of the LHC’s first collisions at the energy of 7 TeV. As it is not possible to predict precisely when collisions will occur, regular shuttles to the experimental control rooms are scheduled throughout the day. Live coverage via satellite and webcast will be offered.

Every accredited journalist will be assigned to visit an experimental control room at a specified time on the morning of the event. In addition to this hour-long time slot in the morning, journalists can sign up for additional visits to the control room of their choice or the computing center in the afternoon.

Individual interviews with a CERN scientist can be arranged by request. For more information, speak with a CERN press officer.

The CMS Experiment, one of the four large experiments at the LHC, has 35 centres on five continents that are willing to welcome media on the First Physics day.

All times below are Central European Summer Time (CEST):

7:00 Accreditation desks open at CERN Reception, all accredited journalists receive their experiment assignment for morning control room visits The Main Press Centre and Quiet Working Space open for journalists’ use
7:15 Shuttle from Reception leaves for the Main Press Centre; this shuttle will run continuously between the Reception and Main Press Centre until 10:00
8:30 Shuttles begin to depart from the Main Press Centre to the experiment control rooms; shuttles will be offered every hour until 18:00; journalists must check their assignment for the morning’s visit time and control room
9:00 First attempts to collide particles at 7 TeV begin Live satellite broadcast begins, available via EBU and webcast; Webcasts begin includes updates from the CERN Control Centre and special physics topics with experts
11:00 Live satellite broadcast ends, webcast continues
12:15 If no collisions have occurred by 12:00, press briefing in the Main Press Centre summarizes the morning, there will be no outside transmission of the briefing
18:00 Live Webcast and visits to the experimental control rooms end
18:15 Press briefing held in the Main Press Centre to summarize the day
20:00 Main Press Centre and Quiet Working Space close

When Collisions Occur

Following first collisions of particles at 7 TeV, a press release will be issued, there will also be a live feed on EBU with reactions from the CERN Control Centre.

Approximately one hour after collisions occur, a Press Conference will be held in the Main Press Centre, speakers may include:

  • Rolf Heuer, CERN Director-General
  • Steve Myers, Director of Accelerators and Technology
  • James Gillies, Head of Communication and CERN Spokesperson
  • Jurgen Schukraft, Spokesperson of the ALICE experiment
  • Fabiola Gianotti, Spokesperson of the ATLAS experiment
  • Guido Tonelli, Spokesperson of the CMS experiment
  • Andrei Golutvin, Spokesperson of the LHCb experiment

The press conference is tentatively scheduled for 11:15am - this is subject to change.

In the event that collisions do not occur on the first day of the Media Event, webcast coverage will be continued the following day and journalists will be invited to return

These pages will be regularly updated with information about the event, including information for broadcasters concerning distribution of images from the events. Updates will also be distributed via CERN's twitter feed.

 

Press and Media Accreditation Procedure

Who can submit press credentials?

Only editorial staff, print journalists, agency photographers, TV and radio crews may be accredited. All others, such as management, marketing or advertising executives of newspapers/magazines, researchers, etc. cannot be granted press credentials.

CERN accredits those whose principal activity or working experience for the last 12 months has been one of the following and who meet the requirements described below:

  • journalists of newspapers/magazines available to the general public, published at least 6 times a year and which generally carry paid advertising;
  • on-line reporters* and freelance journalists;
  • broadcast journalists and their technical support personnel (sound engineers, camera crew, etc.);
  • independent television crews officially mandated by a broadcast station;
  • UN Press Corps (with a valid copy of UN press card).

Please note that priority will be given to news media.

*On-line reporters will be accepted from publications that meet these criteria:

  • material is original, news-oriented and copyrighted by the publication;
  • contents are refreshed regularly and entirely at least every two months;
  • the publication is provided free-of-charge or at a cost that is commensurate with what readers might pay at a newsstand;
  • content must be written by a number of authors.

Applying for media accreditation

Journalists are requested to complete the entire Accreditation Form individually and return it with a copy of their passport/ID and any of the following documents:

  • letter of accreditation from the Editor-in-Chief (or the News Editor for radio/TV);
  • a photocopy of their national/international press card valid through 2009-2010;
  • a recent copy of the page of the publication (list of credits for TV/radio) which provides the names of regular editorial staff and contributors and which lists the journalist seeking accreditation.

Accompanying staff (sound engineers, cameramen, support staff, etc.) should also complete a form and return it with a letter of accreditation from the Editor-in-Chief (or News Editor for radio/TV).

Pre-event accreditation

It is essential that you register prior to the event in order to receive the badge or gain entry to the premises.

Deadline for requesting accreditation is 23 October 2009. After this date we will maintain regular contact with accredited media.

 

Webcast

The recording of the webcast is hosted here.

Five webcasts will be available from CERN on 30 March. The main webcast will include live footage from the control rooms for the LHC accelerator and all four LHC experiments and coverage of the press conference to announce the first collisions. Webcasts will also be available from the control rooms of the four LHC experiments: ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb. The webcasts will be primarily in English.

This schedule is subject to change. The main event is the first attempt to collide protons at 7 TeV in the center of the LHC experiments, a very complicated procedure that could take time to accomplish. Changes from the published schedule will be announced in the webcast

All times are Central European Summer Time (CEST)

Schedule for main webcast

8:30 Webcast begins with live coverage of the LHC accelerator team's daily meeting in the CERN Control Centre
9:00 Webcast continues with the first attempt to collide protons at 7 TeV (3.5 TeV per beam). Live satellite coverage begins via EBU. From 9:00 to 11:00, coverage will include: live footage from the control rooms of the LHC accelerator and experiments; step-by-step explanations of how the LHC teams bring beams into collision, with commentary from the team operating the LHC accelerator; and interviews with leaders of CERN and the LHC experiments.
11:00 Webcast continues; live satellite coverage ends. From 11:00-15:30, coverage will include: live footage from the control rooms of the LHC accelerator and experiments; updates on progress of beams and collisions; interviews with experts on the physics of the LHC at 7 TeV.
12:00 Update from the CERN Control Centre
12:10 Live from the ATLAS Experiment
12:20 Live from the ALICE Experiment
12:30 Roundtable: Dark matter, supersymmetry, black holes and antimatter
12:40 Live from the CMS Experiment
12:50 Live from the LHCb Experiment
13:00 Update from the CERN Control Centre
13:10 Live from the ATLAS Experiment
13:20 Live from the ALICE Experiment
13:30 Roundtable: The Higgs boson
13:40 Live from the CMS Experiment
13:50 Live from the LHCb Experiment
14:00 Update from the CERN Control Centre
14:10 Live from the ATLAS Experiment
14:20 Live from the ALICE Experiment
14:30 Roundtable: Societal benefits of particle physics
14:40 Live from the CMS Experiment
14:50 Live from the LHCb Experiment
15:00 Update from the CERN Control Centre
15:10 Live from the ATLAS Experiment
15:20 Live from the ALICE Experiment
15:30 Live from the CMS Experiment
15:40 Live from the LHCb Experiment
15:50 Replay of live satellite coverage (first transmitted 9:00-11:00)
17:50 Farewell from CERN
18:00 Highlights from the day's event
18:15 Webcast ends

 

Videos

All videos are in the CERN Document Server (CDS) and can be downloaded in a variety of formats. Videos are subject to the CDS conditions of use.
Videos will be added to this list as soon as possible but they may be available sooner in CDS (search using keyword 'lhcfirstphysics').

About CERN

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

Interviews

LHC experiments

ALICE

ATLAS

CMS

LHCb

Animations

 

Photos

Photographs from the LHC First Physics event

Photographs will be made available at the following locations, as soon as they are ready on 30 March:

More links to photos will appear here shortly. Photos will be added to this list as soon as possible but they may be available sooner in CDS (search using keyword "lhcfirstphysics" »).

 

Practical information

What is the date of the First Physics at the LHC event?

The first attempt to collide beams at 3.5 TeV per beam will happen on 30 March 2010. Please see the 'Schedule' page for more information.

What's the news?

Collisions at 7 TeV mark the start of the physics programme of the LHC - at these energies scientists will be able to cross-check data and predictions from previous experiments and potentially discover predicted or unpredicted particles that will help us understand how the universe works. Discoveries will not be made on the first day - science is a long process, and the First Day day marks the start of an exciting new era in particle physics.

What will happen on the First Physics day?

Registration will start at 7 a.m. at the CERN Reception. Accredited journalists will receive a badge and take a shuttle to the media centre on the CERN campus.
From 8:30, shuttle buses with pre-assigned spaces will start circulating between the media centre and the control rooms of the four LHC detectors. There will be a live transmission from all control rooms to the media centre in the morning, and as soon as the first 7 TeV collisions are recorded we will hold a press conference in the media centre.
There will be opportunities to interview scientists in the media centre or in the control rooms. You will also have a quiet working room at your disposal.

What if I can't come?

Please let us know if you will not be able to attend the event as this means that we can accredit people from the waiting list. There may be a local media event near you: a number of scientists from the ATLAS and CMS collaborations are available at various locations around the world to help with local press and media coverage of the LHC First Physics event. Send an email to press.office@cern.ch to find out more.

What will happen before the First Physics event?

On 28 February, the first proton beams of 2010 circulated in the Large Hadron Collider. Over the next few weeks, the LHC operators will follow a careful, step-by-step procedure as they ramp the beams up in energy toward the goal for the first long run of the world's largest particle accelerator: collisions at an energy of 7 TeV (3.5 TeV per beam). The date for the first attempt to collide beams at 7 TeV will be announced by press release approximately one week in advance. Since this is a very difficult procedure, however, it is possible that several days will be required before collisions are actually produced. Follow CERN's twitter feed for regular updates.

What will we be able to see on the First Physics day?

On 28 February, the first proton beams of 2010 circulated in the Large Hadron Collider, and on 19 March, the beams reached an energy of 3.5 TeV. Until 30 March, the LHC team will be working with 3.5-TeV beams to commission the beam control systems and the systems that protect the particle detectors from stray particles. All these systems must be fully commissioned before collisions can begin. It is possible that several days will be required before collisions are actually produced. Follow CERN's twitter feed for regular updates. If we are aware of a delay of 24 hours or more we will of course inform accredited journalists as soon as possible.

What will we be able to film?

The atmosphere in the control rooms, interviews with scientists, the press conference and the CERN site. It will not be possible to see the detectors or the collider itself.

What are the facilities that will be available in the media centres?

You will have wireless internet, telephones, audio and video feeds and four ISDN lines in the media centre. Please bring your own laptops and equipment. There will be vending machines for snacks and the CERN restaurant is a short walk away.

What if nothing happens on the first day?

It is a normal part of running a large and unique research facility such as the LHC that periods of downtime occur. It is possible that a technical glitch on the day will delay proceedings. If this is the case, the schedule of the previous day will be repeated with minor modifications.

How do I get to CERN and where can I stay?

You may find this page useful: How to get to CERN.

I am not accredited. Can I still come?

We can only accommodate a limited number of people. We have started a waiting list and will replace late accreditations with cancellations.

What if I just show up on the day without an accreditation?

You will not be allowed to enter the CERN site without a badge. There will be an ad-hoc waiting list, but we cannot guarantee that you will be able to follow the event. There will be a live webcast and the press conference will be uploaded to the CERN website immediately.

What is the medium-term future of the LHC?

The LHC will run at an energy of 7 TeV for 18 months to two years, with a short technical stop in winter 2010. After this long running period and when the experiments have collected enough data, there will be a long shutdown of roughly a year in which the LHC will be prepared for running at its design energy of 14 TeV.

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