In this section you will find CERN's latest updates and press releases.

 

Press release: LHC experiments are back in business at a new record energy

Geneva, 3 June 2015. Today, CERN1's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started delivering physics data for the first time in 27 months. After an almost two year shutdown and several months re-commissioning, the LHC is now providing collisions to all of its experiments at the unprecedented energy of 13 TeV, almost double the collision energy of its first run. This marks the start of season 2 at the LHC, opening the way to new discoveries. The LHC will now run round the clock for the next three years.

Update: LHC experiments to explore new frontiers in physics

Early tomorrow morning Geneva time, the CERN Large Hadron Collider will attempt to start delivering physics data for the first time in 27 months. After an almost two year shutdown and several months of re-commissioning, the LHC experiments are ready to take data at the unprecedented energy of 13 TeV, almost double the collision energy of its first run. This will mark the start of season 2 at the LHC, opening the way to new discoveries.

Update: First images of collisions at 13 TeV

Geneva, 21 May 2015. Last night, protons collided in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the record-breaking energy of 13 TeV for the first time. These test collisions were to set up systems that protect the machine and detectors from particles that stray from the edges of the beam.

A key part of the process was the set-up of the collimators. These devices which absorb stray particles were adjusted in colliding-beam conditions. This set-up will give the accelerator team the data they need to ensure that the LHC magnets and detectors are fully protected.

Press release: CMS and LHCb experiments reveal new rare particle decay

Geneva, 13 May 2015. In an article published today in Nature, the CMS and LHCb collaborations describe the first observation of the very rare decay of the B0s particle into two muon particles. The Standard Model, the theory that best describes the world of particles, predicts that this rare subatomic process happens about four times out of a billion decays, but it has never been seen before. These decays are studied as they could open a window to theories beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry. The analysis is based on data taken at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2011 and 2012. These data also contain early hints of a similar, but even more rare decay into two muons of the B0, a cousin of the B0s.

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